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Author : Alison M. Gill, Peter W. Williams & Shelagh Thompson
School/Work Place : Simon Fraser University, Canada
Contact : agill@sfu.ca, peter_williams@sfu.ca
Year : 2009

The recent explosion of second home development in tourism areas around the world is a reflection not only of the increased mobility of capital and people associated with the effects of globalization but also the development models employed in many tourism destinations that link real estate development with amenities such as golf courses, marinas and ski infrastructure. Second home residents have differing patterns of use of their properties to those of permanent residents and the literature points to differing attitudes and values between these two groups that may result in conflict (Hall and Müller, 2004). Furthermore, Gartner (1987) concluded that although second-home owners may be sensitive to the environmental conditions and potential impacts of their activities, their behaviours suggest that they do not recognize their contributions to these conditions and impacts. In this paper we examine perceived differences in attitudes and use of water resources between permanent residents and second home residents in an island setting in order to identify sustainable approaches to regulation and management.

Small island settings are especially vulnerable to problems of water quality and supply especially in coastal zones (Gössling, 2001) Second homes are often located in such areas and high occupancy rates frequently occur during drier seasons (Essex, 2004; Ioannides, 2002), thus making sustainable water management a priority. Further, saltwater intrusion into fresh water aquifers can be induced by the exploitation of groundwater through overpumping of wells along the coastline, particularly during drought conditions (Calvache & Pulldo-Bosch, 1997). As Puczko and Ratz (2000) observe planning and policy for water management can be informed by the perceptions and attitudes of permanent and nonpermanent residents.

We explored these issues in a case study of Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada, one of the Gulf Islands lying between Vancouver Island and mainland British Columbia.


List of Articles
No. Subject Views Date
4 Think Tank XIV Residents' Support for Tourism from the Standpoint of ... file 3290 Jun 26, 2014

Therefore, being of a different nature than sustainability pillars, political sustainability (Mihalic et al., 2012) is a requirement for sustainable tourism development (Edgell, DelMastro Allen, Smith & Swanson, 2008; UNWTO, 2004). This ...

Author: Tanja Mihalič, Tina Šegota, Ljubica Knežević Cvelbar, Kir Kuščer 

Year: 2014 

3 Think Tank XIV Psychological Empowerment as Good Policy for Governanc... file 4563 Jun 26, 2014

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the potential impact psychological empowerment can have on sustainable tourism policy objectives, including improving resident attitudes toward tourism, enhancing destination competitiveness, and maint...

Author: B. Bynum Boley & Nancy Gard McGehee 

Year: 2014 

» Think Tank IX Valuing water: Perceived differences in attitude and u... file 4541 Oct 13, 2013

The recent explosion of second home development in tourism areas around the world is a reflection not only of the increased mobility of capital and people associated with the effects of globalization but also the development models employed ...

Author: Alison M. Gill, Peter W. Williams & Shelagh Thompson 

Year: 2009 

1 Think Tank IV Sustainability and Mass Destinations: Challenges and P... file 3874 Oct 13, 2013

In year 2001, the Government of the Balearic Islands decided to establish a tourism tax, named "ecotax", as an important measure to achieve a more sustainable tourism model for the islands. This paper analyses the background of the ecotax, t...

Author: Antoni Serra Cantallops 

Year: 2004 

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