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RESOURCES: PAPERS & PRESENTATIONS

Author : Sara Currie & Lindsay Turner
School/Work Place : Victoria University, Australia
Contact : lindsay.turner@vu.edu.au
Year : 2014

Since Timor-Leste gained its independence in 2002, tourism has been promoted by both government and NGOs as a means to create jobs, build businesses, create income for national and local economics and improve regional economic imbalances (Timor-Leste Government, 2011). Further, there are few options outside tourism for the young, oil-dependent nation to diversity its economy, and Timor-Leste is fortunate to be blessed with the natural, cultural and historic assets that make it an ideal candidate for tourism. However, since independence, progress has been slow. Data for tourism arrivals is scarce and in many cases contradictory, while poor infrastructure, inflated prices and limited choice with regard to accommodation and restaurants continue to impede development.

Further, due to its tumultuous history, Timor-Leste also struggles from a negative international perception. Despite a decade of relative peace and safety, the perception persists that Timor-Leste is dangerous and unstable (Carlos & Carlos, 2011). While tourists are reluctant to visit countries they believe to be prone to political strife and perceived internal problems (Ryan & Silvanto, 2010) in some cases, this perception is based on stereotypes in the media or past political unrest (Vitic & Ringer, 2008). In the case of Timor-Leste, it could be argued the country’s ‘image’ of instability is taking longer to repair than the instability itself and having a detrimental effect on tourist numbers.

Since independence, the Timor-Leste government has promoted sustainable tourism as an important means to diversify the young nation’s economy and create much needed employment, particularly outside the capital of Dili (Cabasset-Semedo 2009; Timor-Leste-Government 2011). Thus marketing the destination as ready for tourism will be as crucial as tourism planning itself.

Unfortunately, there is still an absence of marketing literature from a supply-side perspective. While a considerable amount of research has been undertaken into the desires, motivations and behaviours of tourists, host perspectives still remain largely overlooked (Brickell, 2012). A lack of supply-side perspective leaves us ‘somewhat in the dark’ and is problematic given the representation of one’s culture evokes emotions in many societies and cultures (Konecnik & Go, 2008). Therefore, this paper seeks to better understand the current tourism environment of Timor-Leste from an internal stakeholder perspective. In doing so, it aims to enhance stakeholder collaboration to develop cohesive and effective marketing ideas for the development of tourism in Timor-Leste.


List of Articles
No. Subject Views Datesort
11 Think Tank XVIII Sustainable Experience: Innovative sustainable communi... file 971 Jan 07, 2019

Key words: Customer Experience, Sustainable Marketing, CSR, Communication, Hospitality Management

Author: Annkathrin Weiss & Matthias Straub 

Year: 2018 

10 Think Tank XVIII Persuasive communication: an experiment on hotel guest... file 718 Jan 07, 2019

Key words: personal values, smart water-saving technology, community-based social marketing, science communication, pro-environmental behaviour, field experiment.

Author: Pablo Pereira-Doel, Xavier Font & Candice Howarth 

Year: 2018 

9 Think Tank XVIII What to communicate about sustainability actions of Fi... file 609 Jan 07, 2019

Key words: sustainability, responsibility, marketing, communication, Finland, villa holiday

Author: Katja Pasanen 

Year: 2018 

8 Think Tank XVIII The role of research-based evidence in destination mar... file 425 Jan 07, 2019

Key words: marketing, research-based evidence, partnership, rural tourism, city tourism, sustainability

Author: Yukari Higuchi, Yasuhiro Yamanaka & Hiroaki Hoshi 

Year: 2018 

7 Think Tank XVIII The role of tourism associations in supporting sustain... file 243 Jan 07, 2019

Key words: tourism association, inclusive development, tourism marketing

Author: Niki Glen & Kevin Mearns 

Year: 2018 

6 Think Tank XVIII Communication of Sustainability Efforts in the Hospita... file 299 Jan 07, 2019

Keywords: green marketing, sustainability engagement, small / owner-managed hotels

Author: Sven-Olaf Gerdt, Elisa Wagner & Gerhard Schewe 

Year: 2018 

5 Think Tank XVIII Resilience thinking used as a sustainable tourism mark... file 520 Jan 07, 2019

Key words: protected areas, resilience thinking, sustainability, marketing, tool

Author: Claire Louisa Fordred & Kevin Mearns 

Year: 2018 

4 Think Tank XIV A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Sustainab... file 2732 Jun 26, 2014

Emerging tourist destinations can challenge ecological, economic, social, and quality of life barriers. These issues draw attention towards the consequences of increasing complexity that are often found as a tourist marketing system grows an...

Author: Sarah Duffy & Larry Dwyer 

Year: 2014 

OPA: 2014 Outstanding Paper Award Winner 

3 OPA award A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Sustainab... file 8650 Jun 26, 2014

Emerging tourist destinations can challenge ecological, economic, social, and quality of life barriers. These issues draw attention towards the consequences of increasing complexity that are often found as a tourist marketing system grows an...

Author: Sarah Duffy & Larry Dwyer 

Year: 2014 

OPA: 2014 Outstanding Paper Award Winner 

» Think Tank XIV Stakeholder Collaboration and Contestation in Tourism ... file 2058 Jun 26, 2014

Since Timor-Leste gained its independence in 2002, tourism has been promoted by both government and NGOs as a means to create jobs, build businesses, create income for national and local economics and improve regional economic imbalances (Ti...

Author: Sara Currie & Lindsay Turner 

Year: 2014 

1 Think Tank VIII Moving from Destination Marketing to Destination Manag... file 5611 Oct 13, 2013

This paper provides a case study of how a tourism organisation has interpreted the change from a ‘marketing’ to a ‘management’ approach in destination development. It begins by looking at what the literature has said about destination manag...

Author: David Foster 

Year: 2008 

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